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The history of Clophill, Bedfordshire, UK
Including historical descriptions, maps and statistical analysis.

World War One

Thomas Izzard

KILLED IN ACTION - 14th JANUARY 1917 - AGED 37


 

BORN IN Clophill IN 1880.

PRIVATE 60168. 32ND BATTALION ROYAL FUSILIERS. CITY OF LONDON REGIMENT (FORMERLY 6485 BEDFORDSHIRE REGIMENT

ENLISTED IN BEDFORD.

COMMEMORATED IN LYSSENTHOEK MILITARY CEMETERY, POPERINGE, WEST-VLAANDEREN, BELGIUM.

 

In 1911 Thomas lived at 34 Jacques Lane with his parents Charles, a gardener and Elizabeth, who had been a straw platter. His brother Arthur also lived with them. Thomas worked as a labourer. His father died in 1916. The family had also lived in Back Street in 1881 and Great Lane in 1891. His father had also been an agricultural labourer.

Thomas was in the same regiment as Percy Eddy, but a different battalion.


32nd Battalion, The Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) was raised in London in 1915 by the Mayor and Borough of East Ham. After initial training they joined 124th Brigade, 41st Division at Aldershot in November 1915. They proceeded to France on the 5th of May 1916, the division concentrating between Hazebrouck and Bailleul. In 1916 they were in action at The Battle of Flers-Courcelette and The Battle of the Transloy Ridges on the Somme. In 1917 they fought during The Battle of Messines, The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of the Menin Road and took part in the Operations on the Flanders coast.

The winter of 1916-1917 was the harshest winter of the war when temperatures dropped to -22°C.

The Ampthill News of November 18, 1916 reports:- "Pte. Thomas Izzard, 8th Bedfords, has had many thrilling experiences in the firing line."

The Ampthill News of January 27, 1917 reports:- "News came from the chaplain of the Hospital that he was suffering from nephritis and was seriously ill. Later pneumonia set in."

Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery is the resting place of 10,755 casualties of the First World War. During the First World War, the village of Lijssenthoek was situated on the main communication line between the Allied military bases in the rear and the Ypres battlefields. Close to the Front, but out of the extreme range of most German field artillery, it became a natural place to establish casualty clearing stations.