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The history of Clophill, Bedfordshire, UK
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World War One

Arthur William Gardner

DIED of DYSENTERY - 10th APRIL 1919 - AGED 32


 

Chela Kula Cemetery

 

BORN IN BROUGHTON, NORTHANTS IN 1887

PRIVATE M2/177061. 338TH MT (MECHANISED TRANSPORT) COMPANY, ROYAL ARMY SERVICE CORPS

COMMEMORATED CHELA KULA MILITARY CEMETERY, NISH, SERBIA.

His parents were Thomas William & Eliza. The family lived at Old Farm, Beadlow. His father was an agricultural foreman. Arthur was a farm labourer in 1901 aged 14. Unfortunately I have been unable to find his whereabouts in the 1911 census. He was no longer living with his parents. His father remained at Beadlow and was living with his second wife, Florence. His father states that he had had 8 children, one of whom had died and one of his sons had been born deaf and "dumb".

In 1913 Arthur married Dora Mitchell in Stamford, Lincolnshire. At the time of his death her location is given as Collyweston Road, Easton On The Hill, Northants (near Stamford) and he is also commemorated on their memorial.


The 338th MT company was formed April 1915. Later it served in Egypt with 10th (Irish) Division and Salonika as army troops under GHQ command.

Ampthill News reported in May 1919 - "We regret to record the death of Pte. Arthur Gardiner, eldest son of Mr. T.W. Gardiner, of Beadlow. He served for 3 years at Salonica in the R.A.S.C., M.T., and has recently been in Serbia, where he died from an attack of dysentery whilst attached to the Royal Serbian Army. His wife has received a letter from the Rev. A. Milles, chaplain to the hospital where he died, saying that her husband passed away on April 10th, and was laid to rest with military honours in Vrange Cemetery. Dr Enslie, the Hospital C.O., the Matron, several Sisters, and officers and men of his Company were at the graveside, and had done everything possible for him."

Nish, the ancient capital of Serbia, was the seat of the Serbian Government from July 1914, until November, 1915, it then fell into Bulgarian hands. On the east side of the town is the great Military Cemetery. The British plot, in the South-West part, is enclosed by a low granite wall. The British plot contains the graves of 26 soldiers from the United Kingdom, seven Red Cross nurses, three sailors of the Royal Navy and three unidentified Marines. Of the 26 soldiers, 25 belonged to the R.A.S.C. (M.T.) and died of influenza after the Armistice with Bulgaria.